Oncology October 2016

 
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Oncology
October 21, 2016
Editorial Chronic disease including cancer, kill more than twice as many people as all infectious diseases, maternal and childhood conditions and nutritional deficiencies combined. They are on the rise with the largest increases which are ill equipped to cope with the human and economic toll. We know from decades of experience that tumor shrinkage does not correlate with sustained benefit unless it is linked to improved symptoms. Through effort and much more extensive work with new technologies in detecting cancer and new drugs shown their effectiveness in combating cancer, we have a unique opportunity to significantly reduce death and suffering from cancer by improving their quality of life. Much to the readers delight, this newsletter also provides an extensive coverage of the late breakers, the results of which are likely to give patients care a new definition and also help health care professionals in improving outcomes in patients with cancer.

Propranolol as an Anti-cancer DrugIn a paper published in ecancermedicalscience, the possible use of propranolol in oncology is discussed. Propranolol is a beta-blocker commonly prescribed to treat irregular heart rates and other conditions, but has significant anti-cancer properties as well. This finding has come from the the Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO) project that says that existing and widely-used non-cancer drugs may represent a relatively untapped source of novel therapies for cancer. Read more

Early Trial shows Promise in tackling Leukemia Treatment Resistance In UK, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common form of leukemia with over 4,000 cases annually. Recent years have shown B-cell receptor (BCR) inhibitors to be one effective treatment, but some patients can become resistant to such types of drugs. Hence, a newer therapy for CLL is the need of the hour. Read more

Avelumab induces Sustained Tumor Responses in Patients with Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma Metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, aggressive skin cancer that does not have very effective treatments today. A phase II clinical trial has shown a new immunotherapy drug called avelumab promising in such patients. The trial included patients previously treated for the cancer. It showed 32% of them to experience partial or complete shrinkage of their tumors when treated with avelumab; and those who had their tumors shrank, more than 90% sustained this response for at least 6 months. Read more

Cabozantinib Improves PFS in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: ESMO 2016 Cabometyx™ (cabozantinib) was the subject of eight presentations at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2016 congress. According to one presentation, it significantly improves progression-free survival (PFS) and response rate in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) as compared to sunitinib. The trial was a phase II multicenter trial in which 157 patients with untreated clear-cell mRCC of intermediate or poor risk, were randomized either to oral cabozantinib (60mg once daily) or sunitinib (50mg once daily, 4 weeks on, 2 weeks off). Read more

About m-panels
m-panels is a leading healthcare panel firm focusing on the global healthcare industry. Our clients include all major stakeholders in this area including private think tanks, pharmaceuticals, governments and NGOs. For more information about m-panels, please visit our website: www.m-panels.com
 

Dentistry October 2016

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Dentistry
October 21, 2016
 
Editorial
As the science and technology of dentistry continues to evolve, it is more important than ever that, clinicians have an excellent understanding of the instruments and equipment they will encounter in practice. There have been new advancements made to accommodate new developments in the dental field while basic dental instruments and equipment have remained relatively unchanged throughout the years. This newsletter highlights the earlier detection using inexpensive long-wave length infra-red imaging for early detection of dental caries which helps in saving tooth which remains as a big challenge in dentistry. Much to the readers delight, this newsletter also provides an extensive coverage of the late breakers, the results of which are likely to give patients care a new definition and also help health care professionals in improving their quality of life. 

Imaging Method for Early Detection of Dental Caries

Early detection of dental caries helps save the tooth, but it remains a big challenge in dentistry. Currently, dental caries is diagnosed based on visual inspection and radiography that lacks sufficient specificity and sensitivity to detect caries at early stages of formation when they can be healed. New research now describes a method enabling much earlier detection using inexpensive long-wavelength infrared imagingRead more

First Data on Dental Fillings that will repair Dental Caries

Currently the tooth restorations that we have could replace the carious part of the tooth, but it cannot repair tooth decay. The first data on dental fillings that can actively repair tooth decay is now presented by a professor at Institute of Dentistry at Queen Mary University of London. The researcher has outlined how new bioactive glass composites are unique in their ability to release fluoride, calcium and phosphate that are needed for remineralization of the tooth. Read more

Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities and More Children should get them: CDC

The CDC has issued a report on dental sealant use and untreated tooth decay in school-aged children in the US.  Among school children dental caries is a greatest unmet treatment need with pain and suffering of a tooth ache leading to problems with eating, speaking, and learning. The CDC now says in the report that there is a quick and easy way to fix 80% of the cavities, but most kids do not get it. The easy way is in the form of dental sealants that work well, but not more than 60% of kids who need them, really get them, says CDC. Read more

Sugar Tax could reduce Dental Caries and related Treatment Cost

A new WHO report released 11th October says taxing sugary drinks can lower their consumption and reduce obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D) as well as tooth decay. The report titled, “Fiscal policies for Diet and Prevention of Non-communicable Diseases (NCDs)” mentions fiscal policies that lead to at least a 20% increase in the retail price of sugary drinks would result in proportional reductions in consumption of such products. Read more
 
 
About m-panels
m-panels is a leading healthcare panel firm focusing on the global healthcare industry. Our clients include all major stakeholders in this area including private think tanks, pharmaceuticals, governments and NGOs. For more information about m-panels, please visit our website: www.m-panels.com
 

Cardiology October 2016

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Cardiology
October 21, 2016
 
Editorial

Globally, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality and will become even more prevalent as the population ages. New therapeutic targets are being identified as a result of emerging insights into disease mechanisms, and new strategies are also being tested, possibly leading to new treatment options. In the recent years, outstanding advances in the development of diagnosis and treatment in the field of cardiology is been observed along with its practical applications in the improving the quality of life in cardiac patients. The issue highlights the effect of both hypertension and antihypertensive pills on mental health which highlights the risk of dementia and cognitive impairment in individuals with high blood pressure.  Much to the readers delight, this newsletter makes a significant contribution to the furthering of knowledge along with an extensive coverage of the late breakers, and also contributing to improve the outcome of patients to maximum extent possible

Hypertension and Anti-hypertensive Pills, Both can affect Mental Health

The risk of cognitive impairment and dementia in later life is increased for individuals with high blood pressure, is the conclusion of a scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA).The statement co-author also makes a point that while there is the knowledge that treating hypertension can reduce the risk of associated heart complications, it was not known whether such treatment can lower the risk of hypertension-associated cognitive decline. Read more

Targeting Blood Pressure Control to below 120mmHg could Save many Lives: Study

Intensive treatment to lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) to below 120mmHg would save more than 100,000 lives every year in the US, according to a study by Loyola University researchers. The study was presented at the AHA’s Council on Hypertension 2016 Scientific Sessions. To investigate whether intensive treatment to lower SBP would affect mortality, researchers applied findings from a multicenter study called SPRINT to the US adult population. Read more

Diabetes & Obesity Linked to Liver Cancer

A high body mass index (BMI), increased waist circumference (WC), and type 2 diabetes all together can lead to liver cancer, is the conclusion of a study published in the journal Cancer Research. To investigate, the researcher pooled data from 14 prospective studies involving 1.57 million participants who were asked about height, weight, alcohol and tobacco use, and other factors associated with cancer risk. Read more

AHA Recommendations for Management of Clinically Significant DDIs with Statins

A new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) provides guidance on how to manage the drug interactions of statins with other select heart disease medications. A drug-drug interaction (DDI) may result in a change in either efficacy or drug toxicity for one or both of the interacting medications. And research shows that approximately 2.8% of hospital admissions are due to DDIs. Read more
 
 
About m-panels
m-panels is a leading healthcare panel firm focusing on the global healthcare industry. Our clients include all major stakeholders in this area including private think tanks, pharmaceuticals, governments and NGOs. For more information about m-panels, please visit our website: www.m-panels.com
 

Psychiatry September 2016

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Psychiatry
September 2, 2016
 
Editorial

Estimates of the annual cost of mental health problems is been increasing globally and accounts for a quarter of all GP consultations. Owing to this figures, it is not surprising that the search for effective treatments in psychiatry continues space. Psychiatric research workers remain committed to discovering the new drug therapies to advanced technologies the best mean of overcoming the misery that is mental illness. The most promising approach for reducing the burden of these disorders is to strengthen care within existing health systems. Much to the readers delight, this newsletter makes a significant contribution to the furthering of knowledge about psychiatric disorders along with an extensive coverage of the late breakers, the results of which provides the best possible care for people who suffer from them.
 
Psychosis associated with low levels of physical activity

People with psychosis die prematurely, most of the times due to cardiovascular diseases. A research by King's College London and the South London and Maudsley (SLaM) NHS Foundation Trust on more than 200,000 people in nearly 50 countries has shown people with psychosis to engage in low levels of physical activity. It also found men with psychosis to be over two times more likely to miss global activity targets as compared to people without psychosis.
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Association between depressive disorders and incident AMI in HIV-infected adults

A study in JAMA Cardiology links major depressive disorder (MDD) to a significant increase in the risk of acute myocardial infarction in adults infected with HIV even after accounting for existing cardiovascular and HIV-related risk factors. The study found HIV-infected individuals with MDD to have a 29% increased risk of acute MI as compared to HIV-infected individuals without MDD. However, the association remained at the same level but lost its statistical significance after adjustment for hepatitis C infection, renal disease, and alcohol or cocaine dependence. Read more

Disruptions to sleep patterns may led to suicidality

Suicide accounts for approximately 8000 deaths each year. Some recent researches have highlighted individuals who have sleep problems to be at a higher risk of suicidal thoughts. This is particularly noteworthy given the high prevalence of sleep problem in healthy and clinical populations. A new analysis by the researchers at University's School of Health Sciences alongside the University of Oxford explores narrative accounts of the role of sleep in relation to suicidal thoughts and behaviours.
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Parents' psychiatric disease linked to children’s risk of suicide attempt

Suicide risk or even and violent behaviors can be seen in children perhaps due to genetics, epigenetics, and social and environmental influences. A study in JAMA Psychiatry now shows the risk for suicide attempts and violent offending by children appears to be associated with their parents' psychiatric disorders, which means the risk in children in high across virtually the entire spectrum of parental psychiatric disease. 
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About m-panels
m-panels is a leading healthcare panel firm focusing on the global healthcare industry. Our clients include all major stakeholders in this area including private think tanks, pharmaceuticals, governments and NGOs. For more information about m-panels, please visit our website: www.m-panels.com